Five Most Common HTTP Errors According to Google

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Sometimes when you try to visit a web page, you’re met with an HTTP error message. It’s a message from the web server that something went wrong. In some cases it could be a mistake you made, but often, it’s the site’s fault.

Each type of error has an HTTP error code dedicated to it. For example, if you try to access a non-existing page on a website, you will be met by the familiar 404 error.

Now, you might wonder, which are the most common HTTP errors that people encounter when they surf the Web? That is the question we’ll answer in this article.

The five most common HTTP errors

1. HTTP Error 500 (Internal Server Error)

The description of this error pretty much says it all. It’s a general-purpose error message for when a web server encounters some form of internal error. For example, the web server could be overloaded and therefore unable to handle requests properly.

2. HTTP Error 403 (Forbidden)

This error is similar to the 401 error, but note the difference between unauthorized and forbidden. In this case no login opportunity was available. This can happen, for example, if you try to access a (forbidden) directory on a website.

And the most common HTTP error of all is……….

3. HTTP Error 404 (Not Found)

Most people are bound to recognize this one. A 404 error happens when you try to access a resource on a web server (usually a web page) that doesn’t exist. Some reasons for this happening can for example be a broken link, a mistyped URL, or that the webmaster has moved the requested page somewhere else (or deleted it).

4. HTTP Error 400 (Bad Request)

This is basically an error message from the web server telling you that the application you are using (e.g., your web browser) accessed it incorrectly or that the request was somehow corrupted on the way.

5. HTTP Error 401 (Unauthorized)

This error happens when a website visitor tries to access a restricted web page but isn’t authorized to do so, usually because of a failed login attempt.

Some Additional Comments on Website Errors

We would like to point out that all the error messages above are errors reported by the web server back to the visitor (that is the nature of HTTP errors; they come from the web server you are accessing).

Needless to say, if you can’t access a website at all—for example, if it’s network that is down—you won’t get an HTTP error back. Your connection attempt will simply time out.

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